Tuesday, January 19, 2010

A new IFLC student pushing the compostion envelope

I thought I would share with you a recent post from a new composition student. Many of you have been through In Focus II and I'm sure you can recognize the hard work put into these. It's inspiring really to see someone take to the ideas and theory of In Focus composition so quickly. Well done David!


Excerpt from our In Focus II: 
A Field Guide to Composition Blog

Hi ...
Just a few images from our day in Old Town.
First, the basics — A window in static placement.
Next, the window still in a static placement ... but with an added anchor and some bilateral symmetry. Now the window in active placement, with an anchor that is split.
I like this one. 
A cap and anchor makes it easy to read ... and with the two main elements sitting separately.
The eye wanders back & forth to look for a connection.
The sloping boardwalk makes this image seem edgy and uncomfortable.
There is conflict between the elements as they aren't all sloping together.
Adding this gentleman calms the image with predictability.
He's the most powerful element, drawing attention away from the sloping walkway.
Now this collage of pleasing elements has one very peculiar character lurking.
I think he's even a bit un-nerving.
Below, the eye is drawn to the red long-johns, of course.
Then it jumps to the boy, and we wonder why he is there.
Only then does the eye take the time to survey
The rest of the image, and sample the rhythm of the other elements.
The anchor and cap add some stability.
But what if we came across this image first?
The eye hits the red long-johns first,
but we don't know from where they hang.
Then the boy. He's grieving!
The eye darts back to the clothing,
but then notices the shadow behind it.
And suddenly the image is a bit suggestive and disturbing.
That's all from the Old Town images.
Hey, this weeks homework assignment is endless!
I gotta get to work!



David P

2 comments:

  1. Looking at these makes me want to go through all the homework again!:) Great job David...I love the 2 shots of the old buildings and especially like the last shot. Tells such an interesting story.

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